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Adopting A New Perspective

Adopting A New Perspective

Ann and Rhande had decades of expertise in child welfare, but that didn’t mean they had all the answers when they became foster and adoptive moms. Through their lived experience adopting two daughters, Ann and Rhande learned things they thought they already knew, which was critical to their parenting success.

Redefining Progress and Success

Redefining Progress and Success

Ask anyone who has adopted from foster care about their child, and you’re sure to hear some great things. If they’re honest, they may share some not so great things, too. Parenting an adopted child can have its ups and downs. The key to making it through these challenging times is not to focus on changing the child. It might be better to change your definition of success and progress.

Not Taking ‘Firsts’ For Granted

Not Taking ‘Firsts’ For Granted

Berta, a full-time teacher and foster mom, first met 9-year-old Zoe when Zoe started 3rd grade at Berta’s school. That was the year that Zoe was removed from her home due to neglect. As a foster parent, Berta understood Zoe’s situation – and as a teacher, she was especially aware of the impact that entering foster care could have on Zoe’s education.

Taking the Risk, Time & Time Again

Taking the Risk, Time & Time Again

Brandy and Matt decided to adopt through foster care because of the number of children in the system who need homes. They became foster parents who were supportive of reunification, but were also open to pre-adoptive placements. Now a family of 6, they admit that adopting 4 kids wasn’t in their initial plan. But, they also adamantly insist that their family is “messy, but perfect in our messiness.”

Being Open to the Right Advice

Being Open to the Right Advice

After interviewing for several children and not being selected as the right family for any of them, Scott and Lori Wilson reached out to their adoption consultant for advice. Being open to that advice, and a different approach, allowed the Wilsons to add 3 children to their family almost immediately.

Turning Obstacles Into Opportunities, Pt. 2

Turning Obstacles Into Opportunities, Pt. 2

Donna and Jason Kempf’s adoption journey didn’t end after they adopted two children with special needs. Their daughter Eva-Grace, adopted in November 2019, is medically fragile, and requires a special diet, custom medical equipment, and vigilant monitoring. Read on to learn more about this phenomenal child and her parents.

Believe in Yourself

Believe in Yourself

Shannon and Hubert Schulz do not shy away from a challenge. They fostered and adopted not 1, not 2, but 6 children from Indiana Adoption Program, each with their own unique set of circumstances and struggles. But the Schulzes have always been clear on this point: the world should expect great things from their kids.

It’s A Forever Thing

It’s A Forever Thing

Zanita and Wilhelm have been fostering for over a decade, and they don’t shy away from fostering older children and teens. They bring a different dynamic to Zanita and Wilhelm’s family.

One Weird Family Tree

One Weird Family Tree

Family trees can be complicated for children who have experienced foster care and adoption. Andrew and Jamiell share how they view their family tree now that Jamiell’s adoption is finalized.

Embracing The Chaos

Embracing The Chaos

Taylor and Nathan met their son at an Indiana Adoption Program meet & greet event. Some of their advice for potential adoptive parents: when it comes to adoption, sometimes you just have to “prepare for, and embrace, the chaos…because it’s worth it!”

Magic In The Air

Magic In The Air

For some adoptive parents, like Michael and Timothy, they “just know” when they met a child or sibling group that they’re meant to be family. And when the adoption finally happens, there’s “magic in the air.”

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